Points

Instead of working on my application this morning, I have been spending time reading various weblogs, as well as participating in a few; such as this one at Sam Ruby where Dare says syndication is being built into the operating system and I say I don’t care (with all due respect, because I have a lot of respect for Dare).

Oh, there’s a few quips by Mark Pilgrim in there if you’re all going through Dive Into Mark withdrawals.

I gather that Scoble’s comments are down, but he wants feedback, and someone is working on something that’s secret and only he knows about but it will eliminate the need for comments, and then we can continue the conversation.

I’m playing with some secret new technology that makes the tech blogging world even flatter. Not from Microsoft (the inventor asked me to keep it quiet until he’s ready to release it). But, it totally is going to change how I blog (and it really already has although I can’t change my style until you all get it too). It brought me Leslie’s blog, for instance.

It also will make comments unneccessary. Why? Because there are systems coming that’ll match up — in minutes — a main post and all the comments being made about that post.

I’ve always thought that alluding to ‘secrets’ that others aren’t privileged to know is a conversation killer, but that’s beside the point.

Roger caught the point in a nice way in a post called Misunderstanding “Conversations”:

So when Scoble longs to turn off his comments, I understand. He’s found his limits, and wants to switch to a process that plays to his strengths… that’s a good thing. The problem is that he’s confusing his weaknesses with the technology itself.

No, I think the problem is that Scoble thinks he can have a conversation with 1000 people. If they all talk fast, and say the same thing, “I love podcasts gimme more”, I suppose you could have a conversation with this many folk.

Jeneane gets this point, which is why she wants a new style of aggregator that fits her many feeds and her limited time.

It’s called Blog(between-the)Lines(SM), a new aggregator/reader that serves up the three most important words from across all of the blogs you subscribe to each day! You can get your Blog(between-the)Lines WordPack 2005 delivered to you via email, via text message, or stamped on your head with a branding iron underneath the Free Download Code Number, 666.

You know Jeneane, if you ask nice, Microsoft might build Blog(between-the)Lines(SM) into Longhorn. Heck: it put everything else in there. But that’s beside the point.

What is the point is her sample feed. You have to check out her sample feed. I’m not going to repeat it, though: it’s a secret. So you’ll have to *guess what it is so we can continue having a conversation. Here’s a hint: Halley’s good natured response is based on it.

*Or I guess you could just go over to Jeneane’s and read the post. But that’s not the point.

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9 Responses to Points

  1. James Kew says:

    The problem I have with “eliminating the need for comments” is that also eliminates the ability of anyone without a blog to voice an opinion.

    I don’t think this is a good thing.

  2. James: oh, come on. We have a whole forum over on Channel 9 where anyone without a blog can post their opinion (and, actually, get more readers than if you post on my blog).

  3. Darryl says:

    Robert, isn’t that a little narrow?

    What about people that have no idea what channel 9 is?

  4. mobile jones says:

    Or refuse to sign up for Channel 9 because of the Passport requirement?

  5. Jim says:

    Or got fed up with the crappy Javascript that broke comments for Firefox users?

  6. Scoble: “you’ll see that all you need to do to leave a comment on my blog is to have a blog yourself and link to it”

    ditto James’s comment.
    Are these not trackbacks, albeit registered ones?

  7. Shelley says:

    Links also happen to add to ones technorati rank…

    But I also won’t do a Passport for Channel 9.

  8. Don Park says:

    Well, I did my part by suggesting that FeedValidator should support validation of extensions registered by developers. Sam thought they should just modify the source code to get the job done. *sigh*

  9. Bud Gibson says:

    Personally, I don’t see the problem with everyone having a blog and contributing to the conversation that way. The thing is that I would likely have to have a conversation blog to do this because I do not want all of this polluting my main blog. Hmm, there’s an idea.

    But maybe I’ll just stick with comments because it is easier.