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(Just a note — all the links go to the same page)

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(Why so many links?)

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(Because I can. And there’s not a damn thing any body can do about it.)

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(And because smug, self-serving people with delusions of grandeur who issue ultimatums about what we can and cannot do are beginning to bore the hell out of me.)

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(Got it! Good.)

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(Inspiration for this little piece of work. Oh, and if I’m plumping up this person’s Technorati score by giving him a link, I don’t care. Some of us still remember what a hyperlink is for. Some of us even remember what the Net is for. Here’s a hint–anyone who uses ‘nofollow’ does not fit in either of these categories. )

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(For good measure: Hi Andy how’s it going. Long time no chat. How’s the family? Nice new set of buttons, when did you start pushing this set?)

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22 Responses to Link Link Link

  1. Seth Russell says:

    LOL … ok i get it, but Scoble has a point … my reaction, see last comment was a bit different.

  2. Why did you link to “The irritant of the non-credible journalists”. Aren’t you aware of the fact that when you disagree with someone’s blog post you are suppose to avoid linking to them, so as to punish them for having an opinion different from your own?

    Seriously though, the best thing on that whole page (I mean the part that made me laugh the most) was this comment that Scoble posts way down in the thread:

    You know, I want smart readers only, please. Sometimes you need to fire a reader. You’re fired.

  3. Shelley says:

    Seth, no this is one I can’t concede Scoble a point on.

    Lawrence, I expect only the best from my readers. Where’s your resume? Do you have a Master’s degree? How often do you comment here? If it isn’t at least ten times a week, well, I’m going to have to fire you.

    What can I say? Times are tough all over.

  4. Brilliant piece of up-yours poetry.

    Reminds me of the story of Donald Woods, editor of the Daily Dispatch in East London, South Africa, who it is said once wrote an editorial about the murder of the late Black Consciousness leader Steve Biko in detention by the police. He wrote what was an otherwise harmless piece, but when you read down the first letters of each line in the typeset editorial, it spelled a simple message to the Apartheid government: “Fuck You.”

    I remember fondly that old newsroom, and how deeply we cared about being able to tell our stories.

    P.S. Can I borrow some of your smartness?

  5. Geoff Arnold says:

    The word of the day for Scoble is Wolkenkuckucksheim. Sad.

  6. Ken Camp says:

    Sadly, sometimes even when hit with a clue by four, Robert just blithely shakes his head and continues down his merry path. I really like the guy, but he’s become a drone without new insight and is such a boring read any more than i don’t bother most of the time.

  7. Scott says:

    Here’s what I’ve learned from Penn and Teller (well one thing. I’ve learned a lot from those two and their BS show on DVD).

    If you call someone a liar or a thief, you are subject to slander and libel laws.

    If you call someone an a**hole or a m*****f****r, you are free and clear.

    Robert has called the writer of the original story a liar. All the reporter has to do is produce ONE person who works at Microsoft who will say he told the reporter that 60% of Vista was to be re-written. Then the reporter may be able to sue Scoble for libel (actually if it’s in a blog is it slander or libel? I think it’s libel).
    I haven’t read Scoble in a long, long time. I didn’t make a big production and annouce how I’m not reading him anymore. I didn’t leave a comment at his blog saying “unsubscribed”. I just stopped reading. He’s outlasted his shelf life in my supermarket. I just …. feel smarter since I stopped reading him. I filled my aggreagor with more do-ers and less talkers like him.

    I suggest everyone else do the same. And quit linking to him if I read you for GODS SAKE!. Who cares what he thinks, says, or does.

  8. Ethan says:

    I haven’t read Scoble in a long, long time. I didn’t make a big production and annouce how I’m not reading him anymore. I didn’t leave a comment at his blog saying “unsubscribed”. I just stopped reading. He’s outlasted his shelf life in my supermarket. I just …. feel smarter since I stopped reading him. I filled my aggreagor with more do-ers and less talkers like him.

    Thanks Scott, for saying that. Plain, simple, and much needed.

  9. >I filled my aggreagor with more do-ers and less talkers like him.

    In less than two years I’ve done more than 600 videos (most of which are about an hour long). I work 100 hours a week answering emails, doing blogs, doing videos, planning videos, giving talks, being interviewed, traveling (15 cities, eight countries, in four months) and hosting geek dinners while helping out with a new video channel, on10.net, and helping out with a conference, Mix06. Oh, and all while trying to be a husband and a father too.

    If that’s not being a “doer” I have no idea what it’ll take to get on your “cool kids” list.

  10. But…Do ya, do ya, do ya, do ya wa-ah-nah dance?

  11. Karl says:

    Ummmm…. the irony here is thick. Do I think Robert has a point? Yeah. I actually feel a little sympathy – I would be upset if incorrect information about me or my efforts was being sent around the web and linked to.

    But Robert, since you’re reading this – you’ve helped push it to this point by being such a blog promoter.

    Who determines who is creditable or not – well is the crux isn’t it?

    Links are the measure of influence on the web as it stands today. And bloggers do the most linking.

    It’s the whole: “wisdom of the crowd” thing. So do you trust linkers with zero intervention (a link is vote for influence – good or bad) or feel the need for mediators?

    Who watches the watchmen? Or in this case – who watches the linkers?

    And Robert, your post has more than a little of the flavor of “blaming the users” dontchya think?

    Shelley, this post is great little piece of protest that helps to illustrate the quandary.

    Imagine if it was a member of the Technorati 100 doing it.

    Note – I have no answers – just a hell of a lot of questions.

  12. Robert says:

    I do not read paid schills, nor do I abet liars and thieves, such as Microsoft. Spent too many years working in IT with their so-called products. How many ways can we say vaporware? Virus riddled software? Vendor lock-in? Predatory pricing?

  13. Scott says:

    “If that’s not being a “doer” I have no idea what it’ll take to get on your “cool kids” list.”

    I’m a programmer. Write some code. I don’t produce videos, I don’t evangelize. I’m a hell of a lot smarter reading people like Alex Russel, Scott Hanselman, Wolf Rentzsch, and the Tucows blog.

    I’m interested in reading other programmers, fathers, and scientists. Reading people who don’t talk about things I’m interested in isn’t the best use of my time. I could care less when someone says something bad about Microsoft and how wrong they are. I’m not all that interested in what’s happening at the latest conference because the conferences have all turned into wrestling pay-per-views. Your blog has turned into self-promotion + links to Microsoft stories.

    I just looked at the front page of your site. EVERY POST, with the exception of one (the kinetic art one), is about Microsoft. The second page is a little better, but a lot of posts talking about how cool you are or how in demand you are. Little too much noise to signal for my aggregator. I don’t have time to play my friggin’ game boy, let alone Second Life.

    Maybe if you were to concentrate more on your writing than worrying about how to get on the “cool kids” list, more people would find value in your blog. You can antagonize me, insult me, condescend to me, torture me, or kill me. Just don’t bore me.

    Here’s a experiment, start another blog. Just link to it once from your main blog. Don’t mention Microsoft, don’t mention tech, just talk about your life. Heck, make it an anonymous blog at MSN spaces. Talk about growing up, talk about your college years, talk about your wife, talk about your kid. Talk about where you live. Wouldn’t it be nice to blog and not have to respond to the latest news about Microsoft? I know I’d like your new blog a lot better.

  14. Scott: wait a second. You want a blog where you actually learn something but now you want me to do a personal blog where I post about my personal feelings, my college years, my wife, and such?

    I’m so confused. I guess I better go back to doing nothing.

  15. Scott says:

    “I’m interested in reading other programmers, fathers, and scientists.”

    See, you have to read all the words. They all mean something. You’re not technical enough to interest me, I’m sure I’m not going to see a technical whitepaper written by Robert Scoble, but you are a human being. Sometimes human beings are interesting. Julie Leung isn’t technical, but she adds something to my world. You telling me all about whatever new Microsoft gadget you want to buy and think we all should by doesn’t add anything to my existance.

    I think if more people just STOPPED PAYING ATTENTION to things they don’t like we’d have fewer “Scobleizers”, “online-Dave-Winers”, Reality TV, and internet flame-fests.

    It appears to me that it’s hard for you to deal with this kind of criticism. I’m not calling you fat or stupid or evil or retarded. I’m calling your blog boring, I’m saying I’m not interested in giving you my attention unless you change and I’m suggesting that more people follow my lead. It’s hitting you where you live. And, up until I posted it here, I didn’t do it in an attention-whoring manner and no-one knew. I just stopped reading you. I vote with my pocketbook in the market place and my attention in my aggregator. Would I call up Dell and tell them, “I didn’t buy any of your computers today because they suck.” or would I just …not buy a Dell?

    It’s just that simple. Why would I read something I don’t enjoy reading?

  16. Shelley says:

    To summarize: Some folks like to read your weblog, Robert Scoble (two Roberts in thread), and some don’t. Happens to all of us.

    But if you’re going to quote Ken Camp’s comment at your site, don’t you think you should include the full quote? Leaving off key elements, one might think you were fanning the flames..if one was inclined to think these things, that is.

  17. Shelley says:

    I did want to say, Karl congratulations on your success on Saturday, but more importantly, that cute little baby of yours and her christening on Sunday. Now, what I want to see — since we’re all writing about what we want to see and read in each other’s weblogs — is more photos of Emma Rose.

  18. Karl says:

    Thanks Shelley :) I will definitely share more! We had some camera trouble on Sunday, so I’m looking for my friends and family’s pics. That and I think I’m decompressing this week… the last few have been beyond intense.

  19. Fred E says:

    Robert Scoble:

    I work … answering emails, doing blogs, doing videos, planning videos, giving talks, being interviewed, traveling, hosting dinners

    Sounds like Marx’s explanation of Unproductive Labor to me.

  20. King Bastard says:

    You knew we were going to do it:

    Robert Scoble has been named a bastard of the blogs: http://www.thosebastards.com

  21. Shelley says:

    You have access to some damn good artists at your site, King.