The Power to Hurt

Last night, some of the comments in the Disappointed post talked about the power of words and their ability to hurt people. This is completely unrelated to the events this week, but I’ve never found that my enemies, if that’s the right word because I really don’t equate ‘enemy’ with the disagreements we have online, don’t have the power to hurt me — only my friends have such power.

When people write about you with loathing, for good or bad, you’ve touched their life. They don’t have power of your — you have power over them.

Friends, though, they can rip your guts out and don’t even know they have done so. Sometimes you don’t even know that they’ve done so, until you find your soul dragging behind you, like a bird with a broken wing.

Gods, that was maudlin, but you know what I mean.

Leaving aside issues of sexism, racism, or violence, no one likes to be mocked, scorned, or treated with disdain. But such expressions are just words, from people who really don’t, in the long run, matter.

Your friends, though, they can hurt with the most devastating weapon of all: silence. Come to think of it, that’s a pretty good weapon for your enemies, too.

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7 Responses to The Power to Hurt

  1. “Lord, save me from my friends, and I will look out for my enemies myself,” eh?

    Also reminds me of something I’ve said on some occasions: noone but my parents can make me truly angry.

  2. You are so right. Hurt and anger can only be directed towards those whose actions can affect us, including those whom we respect. Those who don’t matter can only be despised, ignored, or observed with curiosity.

    When a friend hurts you, you have to ask yourself whether they intended to, and whether they’re really your friend.

  3. If memory serves, you’ve done it before and if there was ever a time to do it again, this be it: Bird, please piece together a timeline of events. Verry few people have a complete understanding of what’s happened, when. Flex them formidable logic powers of yern and gather the strings. Chris Locke’s place is as good as any to start…

  4. Christine says:

    So true. So very, very true.

  5. Shelley says:

    Oh wow Charles, I think I’ve had about as much as I can handle of all of this.

    “Lord save me from my friends, and I’ll look after my enemies myself”, that’s great. All of us are nodding our heads in agreement with that one.

  6. Malcolm says:

    Shelley

    Good point… Several of them. Your last paragraph scored a direct hit, hence this comment.

    Careless talk can unintentionally offend far too easily. This is especially true here, where there is no mollifying body language or softening tone of voice to clarify remarks.

    Besides which most sensible folks only ever deliberately insult their friends 1) because their enemies will never forgive and 2) because it is done with affection and reinforces the bond. So, on the subject of being maudlin – Yes of course we know what you mean we’re not ******* stupid. Stop being such a (insert suitably inappropriate, probably sexist but not racist or violent, noun and adjective) and get out more. Just make sure you come back.

    Puts on body armour and removes broadband cable.

  7. Dan says:

    “I’ve never found that my enemies, if that’s the right word because I really don’t equate ‘enemy’ with the disagreements we have online, don’t have the power to hurt me — only my friends have such power.”

    Good for you. But don’t make the mistake, which many are seemingly doing so, of thinking that everyone else does (or should) feel the same way.